Hot off the trowel

Everything you need to grow...

Update

The Lockdown restrictions are changing. As from 8 March, children are back at school, 2 people can meet outside for recreation. One nominated person can visit care homes. As of 17 May, we are able to eat inside cafes, restaurants, and pubs, meet with friends and family indoors, gatherings of more than 30 outside only. The Rule of 6 or 2 households meeting still apply. Hotels etc are allowed to open. We are hopeful that as from 21 June we will be able to resume our monthly meetings subject to our venue being available as from that date.

 

Life is looking up!

Gardens to gander

 

Gardens through the NGS are now opening. Our Treasurer, Wendy Liddle’s garden is now open for the summer.

 

The dates are: 12/13 June 3/4 July 14/15 August 4/5 September The address is 54 Elmleigh, Midhurst, West Sussex. GU29 9HA You will need to book online . Go onto their website www.ngs.org.uk for tickets.

 

West Dean Gardens are open throughout the whole of June from 10.30am-5pm. . Summer is on its way! Tickets have to be booked on line at westdean.org.uk during the COVID19 restrictions.

 

Woolbeding Gardens open as from 6 May Thursdays and Fridays only. Go online to book tickets.

 

Go online to book tickets. www.nationaltrust.org.uk

Insector Clueso! 

The Harlequin Ladybird

 

This is an invasive species that has taken up residency in many of our gardens and homes. They are also known as Multicoloured Asian Ladybirds or Halloween Ladybirds and tend to be bigger and far more aggressive than our 46 native ladybird species. They are native to north-eastern Asia but were introduced into the US during the 1980’s and then into Europe as a form of pest control, as their favourite food is aphids.

 

They are such voracious eaters they are threatening many native insect species, such as native ladybirds, butterflies and lacewings as they chomp through vast quantities of their eggs and they also have a huge appetite for our native aphids. They are bad news for us humans too because when they arrive in our houses to overwinter they spray a nasty yellow toxic chemical around your home and they are biters, which can cause an allergic reaction in some people.

 

So if you see ladybirds that are considerably bigger than our native ones, then just be aware. They are not nice house guests!

Weeders Digest

 

 

 

 

 

Learn to identify, treat and prevent plant pests and diseases with the help of the experts at the RHS. A detailed A-Z plant listing explains common plant problems so you know what to look out for in your garden. Explore more than 300 close-up photos showing symptoms and causes of ailments, helping you to identify and treat problems fast. Includes suggestions for organic, biological and chemical controls to keep you one step ahead of pests and diseases.

Keep your plants in perfect condition all year round.

ISBN: 1405341777

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Top gardening jobs for June  

June 21 is the longest day of the year and the extra light and warmth encourages the garden to put on an exuberant burst of growth. But this extra light and warmth also means weeds will sprout up from seemingly nowhere. Keep on top of them by hoeing regularly in dry conditions.

1. Hoe borders regularly to keep down weeds
2. Be water-wise, especially in drought-affected areas
3. Pinch outside shoots on tomatoes.

4. Harvest lettuce, radish, other salads and early potatoes.

5. Position summer hanging baskets and containers outside. 
6. Mow lawns at least once a week
7. Plant out summer bedding
8. Stake tall or floppy plants 
9. Prune many spring-flowering shrubs
10. Shade greenhouses to keep them cool and prevent scorch.
Musings

 

‘You can’t buy happiness but you can buy plants and that’s pretty much the same thing’

 

Unknown

 

‘An addiction to gardening is not all bad when you consider all the other choices in life’

 

Unknown

 

‘Spring being a tough act to follow, God created June’

 

Al Bernstein

 

‘On this June day the buds in my garden are almost as enchanting as the open flowers. Things in bud bring, in the heat of a June noontide, the recollection of the loveliest days of the year, those days of May when all is suggested, nothing yet fulfilled.’

 

Francis King

 

‘What is one to say about June; the time of perfect young summer, the fulfillment of the promise of earlier months, and with as yet no sign to remind one that it’s fresh, young beauty will ever fade?’

 

Gertrude Jekyll

 

And finally

 

‘A flower cannot blossom without sunshine nor a garden without love’

 

Chinese Proverb